Resurrection Butterfly
Son-Catcher

 
 
 


When Jesus lives in us, he changes us and his light will shine through us. Each sun catcher will be different, just as we are different and unique in the eyes of our Lord.
~ Stacy Laws

 




This 'Son-Catcher' Butterfly was created using the Chrismon-Kids Butterfly pattern.



When the SON Catches you...you are changed!
2 Corinthians 5:17

Just as broken crayons can be used to make a thing of beauty; God uses us, broken and sinful people, to create beautiful examples of his grace! (See Ephesians 2:1-10).  

Copyright 2001 S.A. Keith

How to make a Stained Glass Sun Catcher:

You will need wax paper, old crayons, scissors, an iron, a pencil, a pencil sharpener, and a Christian-themed pattern. Trace the pattern onto a piece of wax paper. Fold the wax paper in half. That way when you cut out the picture you will have two sides, a front and a back. Sharpen the crayons into shavings, and sprinkle them onto one side of the wax paper. Keep about a half inch clear around the crayons to the edge of the wax paper. (The wax paper will seal itself seal so the crayons won't ooze out.) Place the second piece of wax paper over top of crayons. Place a thin towel over the wax paper and crayons, then iron over it on low to medium heat. (Enough to melt the crayons and wax). Allow to cool,  cut around the edge of the pattern and punch a hole in the top. Hang with a string in front of a window so the light can shine through! 

(Adapted from Stacy Laws posting in the Sunday School Teacher's Newsletter,
Archive # 167.)

Optional: Using a black permanent marker, trace over the pattern onto the wax paper so the lines resemble the leading of a real stained glass window.

 



Additional tips and Bible themes:


1. Find someone with an old food-processor that will grind up all your crayons, sorted by color. (We filled coffee cans each with a different color--make sure you peel the crayons first.)
2. Use wax paper bags. Give each child a bag and let him or her spoon their desired colors into it. Before you iron over the bag, fold the open end a couple of times. Now the crayon can't ooze anywhere. Don't let kids put too much in the bags, though--if it's too thick the iron won't melt the crayon all the way through.
3. Don't bother to grind up dark colors like brown and black--in fact, try it with just bright primary colors and see if the colors blend.

Bible themes to accompany melted crayon art:

1. Tell the kids that you're making stained glass windows (you can "frame" them with strips of black paper) and discuss any aspect of the "church": proper church behavior; all God's different people--like the different colors--blend to make His church; etc.
2. Note how the individual colors blend to make a beautiful work of art. God has given us each individual gifts--when we blend them, we can accomplish even more for Him. (Ask the children to note: Is one color more important? Do the colors look prettier by themselves or when they are next to all the others? If one color was missing, what would it look like?)

By Dana Gagnon

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